Arnos Vale Cemetery, Bristol

This is my favourite place to go for a walk in Bristol. A beautifully green hidden gem, this cemetery holds 170,000 of the departed in their final resting place. Most of which has been reclaimed by nature, making this cemetery so incredibly unique.

Opened in 1837, the Arnos Vale was created as a spacious garden cemetery filled with trees, flowers and architecture. This was a welcome alternative to Bristol’s old parish graveyards, which were over crowding and becoming an increasing health hazard.

Ivy taking over
Thomas and Mary Gadd Matthews monument

The cemetery spans over 45 acres and is a great place to grab a coffee and go for a walk. With graves and monuments dating back to the 1800s, this cemetery is full of history.

Rupert and the war memorial

One of the most notable mausoleums, is of Raja Rammohun Roy Bahadoor. Often referred to as the father of modern India, he was well known for his efforts to abolish sati and child marriage in India. He had a huge influence in traditional culture by organizing religious dissenters and pushing for educational, social and political reforms. He came to Bristol from Bengal in 1830, and sadly passed three years later from meningitis.

Happy pup with his tennis ball
Fallen graves

The cemetery is not only home to the departed. If you look for them, you will find the occasional fairy door hidden in the trees. We managed to find eight. I would like to think they’re the ones who are leaving the cups of tea.

The Arnos Vale isn’t just a place of mourning. They also host weddings, fayres, events and parties. The Clever Chef cafe is great place to stop for a drink and cake too.

If you would like to find out more about the cemetery, please check out their website here.

22 thoughts on “Arnos Vale Cemetery, Bristol

Add yours

  1. I love a nice quiet walk through a cemetery to collect my thoughts. When I was in college (many moons ago) and stressed about something, I used to go and talk to the young soldiers buried in the cemetery across the street from campus – it was cathartic.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow that is an amazing place and you have captured fantastic images, I was in Bristol many years ago and I had no idea that this wondrous place existed ! I think once restrictions have been lifted im going to need to pay Bristol a second visit. Thank you for sharing

    Liked by 1 person

  3. What a fascinating place, we love exploring a cemetery and just wandering around amidst all that history. Actually off to Bristol for a couple of days next month so may have to head for Anos Vale now.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Hi Emily,

    And that’s what cemetery should be: a living memorial. Thanks for sharing your adventures.

    Gary

    On Sun, Sep 13, 2020 at 5:08 AM The Blog of Travel wrote:

    > > > > > > > Emily posted: ” > This is my favourite place to walk in Bristol. A beautifully green hidden > gem, this cemetery holds 170,000 of the departed in their final resting > place. Most of which has been reclaimed by nature, making this cemetery so > incredibly unique. > > > > > > > > > > > > Ope” > > > >

    Like

  5. A place where my grandparents are buried in an unmarked grave. For a long time it got overgrown, unloved and visited by unwanted guests. Thankfully, it’s looking much better now. Thank you for bringing it to everyone’s attention. A super post 🙂

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: